Quercus montana

English name(s):
chestnut oak, rock chestnut oak, rock oak
Family:  Fagaceae
Description:
This native tree is a member of the white oak group with rounded wavy leaf margins of lustrous deep yellow-green coloration and dark grayish-brown, deeply furrowed textured bark. Maturing in one growing season and ripening in fall, the acorns are a valuable food source for wildlife.
Habitat:
often found on outlying rocky hilltops growing in dry, rocky, barren soils of acidic pH.
May also be found on.
Notes:
In addition to being an important food source, oak trees provide valuable cover to wildlife and its leaves and twigs are used by many birds as nesting material.
Additional notes:
syn. Quercus prinus


photograph courtesy of Lisa K. SchlaG

field trip archive:  Thompson Ledges 2014

state of Ohio:  county distribution map

 

Plant identification
The Ohio State University Herbarium:
Lake County, 5 August 1977, collectors:  Allison W. Cusick and Kent Scott voucher specimen
view additional voucher specimens and related information
Historical description:
researching

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. An illustrated flora of the northern United States, Canada and the British Possessions. 3 vols. Charles Scribner's Sons, New York. Vol. 1: 624.

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. An illustrated flora of the northern United States, Canada and the British Possessions. 3 vols. Charles Scribner's Sons, New York. Vol. 1: 624.

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / USDA NRCS. Wetland flora: Field office illustrated guide to plant species. USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / USDA NRCS. Wetland flora: Field office illustrated guide to plant species. USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.


"The oak, both in Europe and America, is the most majestic of forest trees. It has been represented as holding the same rank among the plants of the temperate hemispheres that the lion does among quadrupeds, and the eagle among birds; that is to say, it is the emblem of grandeur, strength, and duration; of force that resists, as the lion is of force that acts. ...
In one word, it is the king of forest trees. ..."

Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum, VOL. III, John Claudius Loudon,
p.1717  

  

virtual herbarium sheet 000009
 created by Lisa K. SchlaG, 22.iv.2014
P.S. Please note direction corrections to our August and September 2017 programs located at the North Kingsville Sand Barrens.

2014 The Native Plant Society of Northeastern Ohio
tantus amor florum